About This Site

After hearing about biochar, I decided to investigate the production, uses and benefits of this new substance. However, it isn’t a new but a very old process given a new name. Anyone who has barbecued food over charcoal will realise biochar is just a new name for charcoal. Even the use of charcoal as a biological agent by man is at least six thousand years old.

What warrants the resurrection of this ancient technology in the 21st century?

In short; we have to find a way of removing large quantities of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere or face the consequences.

Various schemes for capturing CO2 and storing it have been proposed. Very few of them actually lock the gas away in anything like a permanent way. Or they make use of mined materials which in itself is unsustainable.

The use of wood and other vegetation to create biochar is sustainable. As long as you do not burn the biochar but use it in the various ways outlined, the carbon will stay locked up for thousands of years. We burn and landfill vast quantities of wood and plant material across the world. Even composting releases the CO2 as it breaks down. This site is about adopting processes that lock up carbon and provide positive benefits to the local economy as well as the well-being of the the entire ecosystem.